Home » Archive

Articles in the Us In The Media Category

Us In The Media »

[12 May 2009 | No Comment | 2,065 views]

The next big thing?Gordon Brown’s masterplan, for parents to be able to complain about schools, received a muted response.
Joanna Moorhead asks teachers, parents and experts to come up with their own big idea
Joanna Moorhead
The Guardian, Tuesday 12 May 2009
Gordon Brown speaks to students at Prendergast Hilly Fields school in south London. Photograph: Peter Macdiarmid/PA
Shirley Williams
Former education secretary
The curriculum is what needs addressing: it’s peculiarly dry and manages to do all the choosing for children, rather than allowing them to choose for themselves. It’s far too narrow and rigorous. …

Read the full story »

Us In The Media »

[8 May 2009 | No Comment | 1,681 views]

By Laura Clark Mail
SATs may finally be scrapped in favour of teacher assessment.
Ministers have accepted ‘in full’ proposals that called for a move away from traditional pen and paper exams.
Children’s Secretary Ed Balls announced the scrapping of SATs in science from next year in favour of assessment by teachers and formal testing of just a few pupils.
Changes ahead: Pupils now face teacher assessment instead of SATs
While pledging that tests in English and maths – under threat of a teacher boycott – would stay for the time being, Mr …

Read the full story »

Us In The Media »

[5 May 2009 | No Comment | 2,674 views]

Alexandra Frean, Education Editor Sunday Times
Primary pupils aged 11 will not be prepared for next year’s national curriculum tests for the first time in 15 years, head teachers said.
Instead of spending up to ten hours a week in the spring term practising for Key Stage 2, children in Year 6 will be able to concentrate on learning and on enjoying what should be the most exciting year in primary school, Mick Brookes, general secretary of the National Association of Head Teachers (NAHT), said.
Speaking after a vote by his union …

Read the full story »

Us In The Media »

[5 May 2009 | 9 Comments | 6,147 views]

Tim Ross London Evening Standard
All children will be expected to start primary school at the age of four under reforms announced today.
The Government promised funding for full-time places in England from 2011. It marks a significant shift in policy and a move towards lowering the already early starting age for formal education.
Currently children have to start education in the term after they turn five, although many start earlier.
Many who are “young for their year” are kept at home until they are thought to be ready for full-time schooling.
But …

Read the full story »

Us In The Media »

[14 Apr 2009 | No Comment | 1,690 views]
Give Us 10% Payrise

By Laura Clark daily Mail
Teachers were accused of ‘ living on another planet’ after demanding an inflation-shattering 10 per cent pay increase yesterday.
The National Union of Teachers insisted the recession must not be used as an excuse to restrain pay rises as they dismissed the Government’s 2.3 per cent offer.
Members said an immediate 10 per cent rise or £3,000 payment – whichever was greater – was needed to prevent staff leaving the profession.
Ian Murch: ‘No morality lessons from ministers’
In a swipe at Home Secretary …

Read the full story »

LEA, Us In The Media »

[14 Apr 2009 | No Comment | 1,744 views]
Teachers demanding 10pc pay rise

By Graeme Paton, Education Editor telegraph
The National Union of Teachers wants an increase more than four times higher than the Government’s public sector pay settlement, prompting accusations that they are out of touch with the realities of the economy.
Private sector workers are seeing their salaries fall at the fastest rate on record and the value of their pensions crumble. Consequently, Gordon Brown has pledged to limit the growth of pay for public sector workers – whose pensions are guaranteed by the state, to 2 per cent.
Public sector workers could see …

Read the full story »

Us In The Media »

[14 Apr 2009 | No Comment | 1,368 views]

Indepentent
By Richard Garner
Tuesday, 14 April 2009
Teachers’ leaders have thrown their weight behind a pay claim of least 10 per cent after hearing a young teacher claim she had been forced to quit and work abroad because she could not afford to live on her salary.
Delegates to the National Union of Teachers’ annual conference voted overwhelmingly for a motion calling for a 10 per cent or £3,000 pay rise next year – plus an extra 6 per cent to counter below-inflation settlements over the past four years. The decision immediately provoked …

Read the full story »

Us In The Media »

[29 Mar 2009 | No Comment | 1,410 views]

Teachers are demanding one day a week outside the classroom mark work and prepare lessons. By Graeme Paton, Education Editor Telegraph
27 Mar 2009
The National Union of Teachers – Britain’s biggest classroom union – insist newly-qualified staff should only spend three days out of every five in front of pupils.
It is also calling for the working week to be slashed to 35 hours and a break for any teaching session lasting more than two hours.
Caning pupils ‘can be effective behaviour control’The demands come amid claims teachers are being over-worked.
Christine Blower, …

Read the full story »

Us In The Media »

[13 Mar 2009 | No Comment | 4,643 views]
URGENT – Today Programme

Urgent Call for Parents!!. Has your child failed to receive the school place of their choice ? Has the current school admission system failed you ? . Want to be on the BBC Today programme ? If so please call Nina Manwaring from the Today Programme BBC Radio 4 on 0208 624 9644

Read the full story »

Us In The Media »

[11 Mar 2009 | 2 Comments | 2,049 views]
5,000 fail to get into a London state school

NEARLY 5,000 children in London were told today that they have no place at a state secondary school for September.
And more than 26,000 pupils – one in three – missed out on their first choice school as London families were hardest hit by the intense competition.
The success rate fell in 12 boroughs this year, leaving thousands of parents facing the prospect of sending their children to less popular comprehensives, or trying to scrape together enough money to go private.
The figures came as parents of 78,180 children across the capital were …

Read the full story »