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Creating a new school National Curriculum: have your say

8 February 2011 1,977 views No Comment

Published: Thursday, 20 January 2011


A review of the National Curriculum for 5 to 16 year olds in England has been launched. The review will consider what subjects should be compulsory at what age and what children should be taught in the main subjects at what age. The aim is to give teachers greater freedom and ensure the curriculum compares to the best school systems in the world. Have your say

The National Curriculum sets out what key subjects are taught in schools in England. Not everything taught in schools is part of the National Curriculum – some of it forms part of the wider school curriculum.
However, the government believes that over the years the National Curriculum has come to cover more subjects than it should. Slimming the curriculum down to cover only essential subjects would:
• give teachers greater freedom over how they organise and teach the curriculum
• provide young people with the key knowledge they need
• take into account the needs of different groups including the most able and pupils with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND)
• ensure the National Curriculum compares with the most successful school systems in the world
• allow parents to understand what their children should be learning and to support their education
To help develop this new National Curriculum for 5 to 16 year olds in England, the review will consider what subjects should be compulsory at what age and what children should be taught in the main subjects at what age.
Following public consultation, the aim is to begin teaching the new National Curriculum in maintained schools from September 2013. To begin with this will only cover English, mathematics, science, and physical education, with the new curriculum for other subjects coming in in 2014.

A Call for Evidence has been issued to help create the new National Curriculum for 5 to 16 year olds in England. If you would like to get involved, read the consultation document in full by following the link below. You can then respond online, or by printing off a response form.

The Call for Evidence closes on 14 April 2011.

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